Choosing the Decisions We Make

You know that feeling of being run down by the overwhelming weight of the decisions that you have to make on a regular basis? I definitely have, and I’ve been practicing a solution that is working for me.

Decisions Use Energy

All decisions take up energy as we try process them. I’m starting to see this as neither good nor bad. What is important is where we prefer to extend our energy. This doesn’t mean that I want to automate everything and then sleep on the beach all day. There is a therapeutic beauty in daily practice of things we enjoy, like a [lightbox type=”image” href=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lL9BiNuImws”]Japanese Tea Ceremony[/lightbox].

I’ll share an example from my experience. Making a decision of which trail or path to run on is a decision that I enjoy making. Trying to figure out which bills I need to pay at what time is not a decision process I enjoy.

From The Simple Dollar:

If we can find ways to take some of those decisions out of our hands, we reduce the number of active decisions we have to make in a given day. Thus, our decision fatigue is reduced and we’re less likely to make poor decisions due to such fatigue.

Our solution is to automate little decisions. We do this by spending time up front thinking of ways to eliminate some of our little regular decisions. Even eliminating tiny decisions really helps.

Automating Tasks That Aren’t Important

There are so many tools available that can help us with those decisions that we don’t enjoy as much. It might take a little work up front but the ease of mind later on is totally worth it.

Using the bill paying example above, I have set up my bills to be paid automatically based on the days that I get paid. This helps free my mind from trying to hold it all in my mental calendar. It is so simple and it is very easy to forget that it is simple.

Choosing the Decisions We Make

Automating some of these tasks allows me to enjoy the tasks/decisions that I enjoy to have as part of my daily routine. By doing this, I feel more fulfilled and have more energy to give to my favorite tasks.

I can reassess these automated tasks and the tasks that I enjoy every few months to see if they are still working to my benefit. This is much less upkeep than having to deal with them all daily.

What decisions do you enjoy making? Which would you prefer not to make as often? Are you able to automate some of those tasks?

Learning Revolution by Sir Ken Robinson

sir ken robinson

sir ken robinsonIf you couldn’t tell by the last few posts, I’ve been on a TED Talks kick. I really enjoy the caliber of the speakers and the amazing ideas behind the speeches.

Sir Ken Robinson talks here about how to transform education, as in a revolution. He believes that we should challenge everything we know, especially if it is logical or common sense. We rise with any challenge that comes along. It is a natural, flowing way of finding solutions. Continue reading “Learning Revolution by Sir Ken Robinson”

How We Learn by Watching

human brain scan

human brain scanHumans are an amazing species and a lot of what makes us special is our brain. As we start to dive deeper into brain research we are finding more and more that our consciousness is linked to everyone else’s.

At a TED Talk in 2009, Neuroscientist Vilayanur Ramachandran, talks to us about how watching somebody perform a task has the same effect on our brain than if we performed that task. It is our body that sends signals saying it wasn’t this body that performed that action. If we disable the signals from our body, we can effectively experience what we see just as if we had done it.

This may have huge uses in muscle memory and learning. Think of the empathy that we would have for others if we got our physical body out of the way. Imagine the ability that we all could have if our bodies responded to our consciousness by what they have learned from others. It’s worth the practice to see how much we can learn by watching.

Video Transcript

I’d like to talk to you today about the human brain, which is what we do research on at the University of California. Just think about this problem for a second. Here is a lump of flesh, about three pounds, which you can hold in the palm of your hand. But it can contemplate the vastness of interstellar space. It can contemplate the meaning of infinity, ask questions about the meaning of its own existence, about the nature of God.

And this is truly the most amazing thing in the world. It’s the greatest mystery confronting human beings: How does this all come about? Well, the brain, as you know, is made up of neurons. We’re looking at neurons here. There are 100 billion neurons in the adult human brain. And each neuron makes something like 1,000 to 10,000 contacts with other neurons in the brain. And based on this, people have calculated that the number of permutations and combinations of brain activity exceeds the number of elementary particles in the universe.

So, how do you go about studying the brain? One approach is to look at patients who had lesions in different part of the brain, and study changes in their behavior. This is what I spoke about in the last TED. Today I’ll talk about a different approach, which is to put electrodes in different parts of the brain, and actually record the activity of individual nerve cells in the brain. Sort of eavesdrop on the activity of nerve cells in the brain.

Now, one recent discovery that has been made by researchers in Italy, in Parma, by Giacomo Rizzolatti and his colleagues, is a group of neurons called mirror neurons, which are on the front of the brain in the frontal lobes. Now, it turns out there are neurons which are called ordinary motor command neurons in the front of the brain, which have been known for over 50 years. These neurons will fire when a person performs a specific action. For example, if I do that, and reach and grab an apple, a motor command neuron in the front of my brain will fire. If I reach out and pull an object, another neuron will fire, commanding me to pull that object. These are called motor command neurons that have been known for a long time.

But what Rizzolatti found was a subset of these neurons, maybe about 20 percent of them, will also fire when I’m looking at somebody else performing the same action. So, here is a neuron that fires when I reach and grab something, but it also fires when I watch Joe reaching and grabbing something. And this is truly astonishing. Because it’s as though this neuron is adopting the other person’s point of view. It’s almost as though it’s performing a virtual reality simulation of the other person’s action.

Now, what is the significance of these mirror neurons? For one thing they must be involved in things like imitation and emulation. Because to imitate a complex act requires my brain to adopt the other person’s point of view. So, this is important for imitation and emulation. Well, why is that important? Well, let’s take a look at the next slide. So, how do you do imitation? Why is imitation important? Mirror neurons and imitation, emulation.

Now, let’s look at culture, the phenomenon of human culture. If you go back in time about [75,000] to 100,000 years ago, let’s look at human evolution, it turns out that something very important happened around 75,000 years ago. And that is, there is a sudden emergence and rapid spread of a number of skills that are unique to human beings like tool use, the use of fire, the use of shelters, and, of course, language, and the ability to read somebody else’s mind and interpret that person’s behavior. All of that happened relatively quickly.

Even though the human brain had achieved its present size almost three or four hundred thousand years ago, 100,000 years ago all of this happened very, very quickly. And I claim that what happened was the sudden emergence of a sophisticated mirror neuron system, which allowed you to emulate and imitate other people’s actions. So that when there was a sudden accidental discovery by one member of the group, say the use of fire, or a particular type of tool, instead of dying out, this spread rapidly, horizontally across the population, or was transmitted vertically, down the generations.

So, this made evolution suddenly Lamarckian, instead of Darwinian. Darwinian evolution is slow; it takes hundreds of thousands of years. A polar bear, to evolve a coat, will take thousands of generations, maybe 100,000 years. A human being, a child, can just watch its parent kill another polar bear, and skin it and put the skin on its body, fur on the body, and learn it in one step. What the polar bear took 100,000 years to learn, it can learn in five minutes, maybe 10 minutes. And then once it’s learned this it spreads in geometric proportion across a population.

This is the basis. The imitation of complex skills is what we call culture and is the basis of civilization. Now there is another kind of mirror neuron, which is involved in something quite different. And that is, there are mirror neurons, just as there are mirror neurons for action, there are mirror neurons for touch. In other words, if somebody touches me, my hand, neuron in the somatosensory cortex in the sensory region of the brain fires. But the same neuron, in some cases, will fire when I simply watch another person being touched. So, it’s empathizing the other person being touched.

So, most of them will fire when I’m touched in different locations. Different neurons for different locations. But a subset of them will fire even when I watch somebody else being touched in the same location. So, here again you have neurons which are enrolled in empathy. Now, the question then arises: If I simply watch another person being touched, why do I not get confused and literally feel that touch sensation merely by watching somebody being touched? I mean, I empathize with that person but I don’t literally feel the touch. Well, that’s because you’ve got receptors in your skin, touch and pain receptors, going back into your brain and saying “Don’t worry, you’re not being touched. So, empathize, by all means, with the other person, but do not actually experience the touch, otherwise you’ll get confused and muddled.”

Okay, so there is a feedback signal that vetoes the signal of the mirror neuron preventing you from consciously experiencing that touch. But if you remove the arm, you simply anesthetize my arm, so you put an injection into my arm, anesthetize the brachial plexus, so the arm is numb, and there is no sensations coming in, if I now watch you being touched, I literally feel it in my hand. In other words, you have dissolved the barrier between you and other human beings. So, I call them Gandhi neurons, or empathy neurons. (Laughter)

And this is not in some abstract metaphorical sense. All that’s separating you from him, from the other person, is your skin. Remove the skin, you experience that person’s touch in your mind. You’ve dissolved the barrier between you and other human beings. And this, of course, is the basis of much of Eastern philosophy, and that is there is no real independent self, aloof from other human beings, inspecting the world, inspecting other people. You are, in fact, connected not just via Facebook and Internet, you’re actually quite literally connected by your neurons. And there is whole chains of neurons around this room, talking to each other. And there is no real distinctiveness of your consciousness from somebody else’s consciousness.

And this is not mumbo-jumbo philosophy. It emerges from our understanding of basic neuroscience. So, you have a patient with a phantom limb. If the arm has been removed and you have a phantom, and you watch somebody else being touched, you feel it in your phantom. Now the astonishing thing is, if you have pain in your phantom limb, you squeeze the other person’s hand, massage the other person’s hand, that relieves the pain in your phantom hand, almost as though the neuron were obtaining relief from merely watching somebody else being massaged.

So, here you have my last slide. For the longest time people have regarded science and humanities as being distinct. C.P. Snow spoke of the two cultures: science on the one hand, humanities on the other; never the twain shall meet. So, I’m saying the mirror neuron system underlies the interface allowing you to rethink about issues like consciousness, representation of self, what separates you from other human beings, what allows you to empathize with other human beings, and also even things like the emergence of culture and civilization, which is unique to human beings. Thank you. (Applause)

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The Champion Mentality

ancient thinker

As I was sitting in the crowd during the opening keynote at Blog World 2011 Los Angeles I was awestruck. This was the first conference that I had ever been to and it was overwhelming, in a good way. Seeing Peter Shankman speak so easily about rocking some of his ideas got everyone excited. Even though I felt the same excitement I started thinking, “why am I excited? What is he saying that is speaking to me? How is he saying it that speaks to me? What is his thought process to grow this idea or project?” This lead me to start thinking more about the people that we put on pedestals and why we put them there. Luckily I met some of the other speakers a little later after all of this had been going through my head. Talking to them was further research into these questions and the key thing I learned from it was to look at everyone and everything in a different way than I previously had.

There is a mentality that helps some people exceed where others fail. This is the champion mentality. It has been called many different things by many different leaders. Many leaders never could pinpoint what it is that made them a leader or why they did a certain something in a certain situation. I would like to find out more about this a encourage people to work on some these traits to become the best in their own lives.

Greatness

ancient thinkerThere are many different thought patterns and shifts that can take us all in very different directions. Some will help lead us to greatness, which is different for all of us based on our own rating metrics. Because of the thousands of different traits that each of us have we all can be great in so many different ways. My goal is to find some commonalities between the champions in each region and why a certain person is thought of as great.

When we label someone great or think that someone is successful, it is often because they make us feel that we are that way as well, or at the very least, we can achieve it. This feeling is what keeps the dream alive and the passion behind the dream is what makes it achievable. Many times we empathize in certain ways with champions and feel as though we are in their place in that moment and it makes us feel like a champion.

Pre Greatness

Have you ever felt like you were stuck in a rut while everyone around you is starting to have awesome things happen to them, ie. they got the job that you didn’t, they have friends when you don’t have friends, etc. Some people call it failure, mediocre, despair, why me?, unfair, or underwhelming. I like to call it Pre Greatness and I’ll tell you why.

After a crushing depression based on my own body’s chemicals added to some severe emotional situations that I had encountered I found myself spinning my wheels in a rut of blah. I still had some great moments and some bad moments but it wasn’t consistent or predicted.

I then developed the mentality for quite a while that everyone else got the things they wanted but I never got what I wanted. I wasn’t bitter about it but I definitely thought I was just unlucky or that I was being punished unfairly. Now I see things in a completely different way.

Now I see that everyone has greatness inside them and it’s up to them to find it and share it with others. That is why I call it Pre Greatness. The bottle just needs to be shaken up and opened to let the greatness out others.

Conclusion

We all have the a champion inside us. In order to let it out we need to be our life’s champion and lead ourselves to greatness. It’s important to keep looking at things in different ways so we can see where we are going and make sure that it is in the direction we are hoping to go.

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